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Pet Owners and Moving: Make the Relocation Easier for Your Kitty

Pet Owners and Moving: Make the Relocation Easier for Your Kitty

06Jan 2015

You must have heard that, according to the studies made, the vast majority of people consider moving house to be a  very stressful experience (and truth be told some of them even place this experience very close to the feelings generated by death and divorce as well). If house removals are difficult on you, as human, can you imagine what pets feel when they are uprooted from the place that used to be theirs and where all their routines took place – without even knowing what is actually going on? If you are the proud mother or father of a kitty, you probably know that these gracious beings don’t take moving very well. The chaos, the negative energy generated by the entire removals process and even the large number of boxes that are distracting for a kitty – all these things can really scare off your cat. How can you make the relocation “affair” easier for your meowing friend? Here are some tips to help you out: •    Keep your cool. You know what they say about cats being able to sense negative energy? They do! You don’t want to stress out your beautiful feline, so make sure you try to keep yourself as calm as possible. Here’s an extra tip: planning your house removal well ahead of time usually helps with not crazy on the actual removals day. •    Introduce your kitten to the new place. Ideally, you should take your kitty to “see” the new place before you bring him/her there. This will help your cat get acquainted with the smell, feeling and energy of that place and he/she will have less of a shock when the actual removal happens. •    Don’t change anything in your pet’s schedule. This is valid for cats, dogs and pretty much any other pet you may keep. Make sure you feed and walk your pets at the same hours, that you play with them, that you provide them with attention and nourishment and that you don’t change anything in their usual day-to-day routines. •    Don’t bring in all the boxes at once. There’s a reason the Internet is blooming with pictures of cats that get stuck in their boxes – and that’s not necessarily related to the fact that kittens may genuinely love boxes (unless they do and it’s part of their “plan”). Generally speaking, cats are really curious little furry balls of joy and everything that is new about their surroundings will have to be touched, sniffed, purred at and played with before the cat “befriends” it – and this includes objects as well. Therefore, if you don’t want to confuse your cat too much, you should try to bring in your moving boxes in a gradual way. •    Try to not allow your cat to get into the feet of the movers – not because they will not like it, but because your kitten may easily get hurt (and confused, considering the fact that a bunch of strangers will be “ruining” his/her “cat kingdom”). Instead, lock your cat in a different room with some water and some food and regularly check out on him/her. •    Invest in a comfortable, spacious crate for the transportation. If your cat is like every other cat in the world, travelling by car and sticking his/her tongue out at strangers on the back window of your car will not be his/her “thing”. Introduce your furry friend to a nice crate and keep him/her there for the entire road.

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